Vegan Pancakes

My Marin County roommate taught me how the “boujee hippies” do breakfast.


Makes 7-8 medium sized pancakes

Blend the Batter

Puree the following ingredients in a blender.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups oatmeal
  • 1.5 cups almond milk
  • 1 banana
  • 2 tbsp ground flaxseed
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 0.5 tsp cinnamon ground
  • 0.5 tsp vanilla extract

Get the Griddle

Standard pancake griddling rules apply

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries or other small berries (optional)

Grease the griddle with coconut oil.

Pour about 1/2 cup of batter on a hot griddle for each pancake.

Drop fresh berries in the batter before it’s too firm. Or not; they taste great plain as well.

Flip them once the batter starts to thicken up. It should take about 3-4 minutes per side.


Want to Impress Your Friends?

Drizzle with honey or maple syrup.

Sprinkle on powdered sugar.

Garnish with mint leaves and fresh berries.

Don’t Have Any Friends?

Cook up all the pancakes and freeze them.

Throw them in the toaster for a quick, healthy breakfast.


VeganPancake_660

The Science of Scientific Writing

“If the reader is to grasp what the writer means, the writer must understand what the reader needs.


“Science is often hard to read. Most people assume that its difficulties are born out of necessity, out of the extreme complexity of scientific concepts, data and analysis. We argue here that complexity of thought need not lead to impenetrability of expression; we demonstrate a number of rhetorical principles that can produce clarity in communication without oversimplifying scientific issues. The results are substantive, not merely cosmetic: Improving the quality of writing actually improves the quality of thought.”


Source

American Scientist: The Science of Scientific Writing by George GopenJudith Swan

Data Fraud in Clinical Trials

“Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality.”


Source

NCBI: Data fraud in clinical trials

Barbershop-Based Healthcare Study Lowers High Blood Pressure in African-American Men

“New England Journal of Medicine: Nearly 64% Reduced Their Blood Pressure to Healthy Levels After Barbers Promoted Follow-Up With Pharmacists in the Barbershops.

“African-American men lowered their high blood pressure to healthy levels when aided by a pharmacist and their barber, according to a new study from the Smidt Heart Institute.”


Source

Cedars Sinai: Barbershop-Based Healthcare Study Lowers High Blood Pressure in African-American Men

MOOC: Learning From Data – Machine Learning

“This is an introductory course in machine learning (ML) that covers the basic theory, algorithms, and applications. ML is a key technology in Big Data, and in many financial, medical, commercial, and scientific applications. It enables computational systems to adaptively improve their performance with experience accumulated from the observed data. ML has become one of the hottest fields of study today, taken up by undergraduate and graduate students from 15 different majors at Caltech. This course balances theory and practice, and covers the mathematical as well as the heuristic aspects. The lectures below follow each other in a story-like fashion:

  • What is learning?
  • Can a machine learn?
  • How to do it?
  • How to do it well?
  • Take-home lessons.

“The 18 lectures are about 60 minutes each plus Q&A.”


Source

Caltech: Learning From Data Machine Learning Course by Yaser S. Abu-Mostafa

Textbook: Learning From Data by Yaser S. Abu-Mostafa and Malik Magdon-Ismail

 

What’s the Point? Centering Independent Variable on Mean in Regression Models

Centering continuous independent variables was one of the earliest lessons in my linear regression class. I was recently asked to explain, “what’s the point?” of going through the trouble of centering? I was at a loss, and realized I had been assuming the answer was obvious when it was not.

After a quick google, this article explained the answer well. In short, centering is useful when interpreting the intercept is important. Here example of age of development of language in infants. Her original article has been copied below.

Should You Always Center a Predictor on the Mean?

by Karen Grace-Martin

Centering predictor variables is one of those simple but extremely useful practices that is easily overlooked.

It’s almost too simple.

Centering simply means subtracting a constant from every value of a variable. What it does is redefine the 0 point for that predictor to be whatever value you subtracted. It shifts the scale over, but retains the units.

The effect is that the slope between that predictor and the response variable doesn’t change at all. But the interpretation of the intercept does.

The intercept is just the mean of the response when all predictors = 0. So when 0 is out of the range of data, that value is meaningless. But when you center X so that a value within the dataset becomes 0, the intercept becomes the mean of Y at the value you centered on.

What’s the point? Who cares about interpreting the intercept?

It’s true. In many models, you’re not really interested in the intercept. In those models, there isn’t really a point, so don’t worry about it.

But, and there’s always a but, in many models interpreting the intercept becomes really, really important. So whether and where you center becomes important too.

A few examples include models with a dummy-coded predictor, models with a polynomial (curvature) term, and random slope models.

Let’s look more closely at one of these examples.

In models with a dummy-coded predictor, the intercept is the mean of Y for the reference category—the category numbered 0. If there’s also a continuous predictor in the model, X2, that intercept is the mean of Y for the reference category only when X2=0.

If 0 is a meaningful value for X2 and within the data set, then there’s no reason to center. But if neither is true, centering will help you interpret the intercept.

For example, let’s say you’re doing a study on language development in infants. X1, the dummy-coded categorical predictor, is whether the child is bilingual (X1=1) or monolingual (X1=0). X2 is the age in months when the child spoke their first word, and Y is the number of words in their vocabulary for their primary language at 24 months.

If we don’t center X2, the intercept in this model will be the mean number of words in the vocabulary of monolingual children who uttered their first word at birth (X2=0).

And since infants never speak at birth, it’s meaningless.

A better approach is to center age at some value that is actually in the range of the data. One option, often a good one, is to use the mean age of first spoken word of all children in the data set.

This would make the intercept the mean number of words in the vocabulary of monolingual children for those children who uttered their first word at the mean age that all children uttered their first word.

One problem is that the mean age at which infants utter their first word may differ from one sample to another. This means you’re not always evaluating that mean that the exact same age. It’s not comparable across samples.

So another option is to choose a meaningful value of age that is within the values in the data set. One example may be at 12 months.

Under this option the interpretation of the intercept is the mean number of words in the vocabulary of monolingual children for those children who uttered their first word at 12 months.

The exact value you center on doesn’t matter as long it’s meaningful, holds the same meaning across samples, and within the range of data. You may find that choosing the lowest value or the highest value of age is the best option. It’s up to you to decide the age at which it’s most meaningful to interpret the intercept.


Source

The Analysis Factor: Should You Always Center a Predictor on the Mean? by Karen Grace-Martin

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